|
|
|
Neosho Daily News - Neosho, MO
  • Murder mystery play continues through Saturday evening at Crowder

  • In time for Halloween, the Crowder College Theatre Department continues tonight with its production of “Postmortem,” showing at 7:30 p.m. at the Elsie Plaster Community Center on the Neosho campus.
    • email print
  • So who done it?
    If you already know, best keep mum.
    In time for Halloween, the Crowder College Theatre Department continues tonight with its production of "Postmortem," showing at 7:30 p.m. at the Elsie Plaster Community Center on the Neosho campus. Thursday was opening night. The witty, murder-mystery play by Ken Ludwig will continue on Saturday with a 2 p.m. matinee and a 7:30 p.m. finale.
    For mature audiences, the synopsis is as follows: "Actor-manager and playwright William Gillette, best known for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes in his hugely successful stage adaptation of the Conan Doyle character, has invited his sister and the cast of his latest revival of the play for a weekend at his magnificent pseudo medieval castle on a bluff overlooking the Connecticut River. For entertainment, Gillette has arranged a séance. Now the scene is set for his greatest role. Someone is trying to murder William Gillette and he suspects it is one of his guests. Intrepid, eccentric Gillette plans to solve the case himself, a la Sherlock Holmes."
    "Since we show our first play in the fall, in October, we try to do something a little darker, but I wanted to do something that was funny too," said director Drew Fethers.
    Kyle Jacobs, a Crowder theatre major, who plays the part of smart-alec actor Bobby Carlyle, said the role was somewhat of a natural fit for him, as he said he and his character share many of the same personality traits.
    "He's very charismatic and flighty, everything about him is very random, yet very energetic and excited," Jacobs said. "Even when he's angry or upset, he's still very high spirited. Part of the character comes naturally because he's very witty and very sarcastic at times. He just has punch lines or jokes that are short and to the point. A very dry humor."
    He added that, as always on the stage, it still took a lot of time and effort to develop his character and get it just right.
    "It's all really come together in the last week," Jacobs said Wednesday. "With costumes and makeup and props it really helps get into character. I'm really excited. It should be a good show."
    Jaymes Wilkins, general studies major, plays the part of Leo Barrett, a distinguished, if somewhat dismissive, Broadway actor who, like the rest of the characters, exemplifies some of the attitude of the early 1920s the play is set in.
    "He takes the best of what people have, but sometimes he lets his own disdain for common behavior show," Wilkins said.
    Playing the role of a middle-aged man, Wilkins joked that it would hopefully give him "some insight into what it's going to be like to be older when I try and do it myself."
    Page 2 of 2 - "Given the size of this role, I'd say it's a little bit easier than others I've had, but I put the same thought and emotion into this character as those other characters, and the same work goes into developing this character," Wilkins said.
    He said he loved the play as soon as he read the script. With the revived hype over Sherlock Holmes in the last few years, Wilkins said he thought it would be fun to "do characters who do those characters."
    Tickets are available at the door and are $8 general admission, $5 for senior citizens and students and $4 for Crowder students and staff.
    "Everybody likes a good, old-fashioned murder mystery," said Fethers, director. "And it's funny, too. It's very dry humor. It's witty, it's sarcastic. And people like guns."

      • calendar