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Neosho Daily News - Neosho, MO
  • RUSSELL HIVELY: Good deeds

  • I was surprised to see a STOP sign and its post lying in the middle of Veta Street as I headed out for my walk along Wildcat Boulevard the other morning.
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  • I was surprised to see a STOP sign and its post lying in the middle of Veta Street as I headed out for my walk along Wildcat Boulevard the other morning. My first thoughts were that someone could run over this sign if they came down the hill too fast.
    For safety purposes, I pulled the sign over to the side of the road. I knew city workers would spot it, find where it belongs, and take care of it.
    "That was kind of a good deed" I said to myself as I walked on. I kept thinking of good deeds all along my walk that morning.
    The recent Lions magazine had an article about literacy. Not being able to read must be horrible. The new International Lions Club president has declared 2013 as the "Year of Literacy," and suggests all Lions clubs find ways to help those who cannot read.
    At the end of the article were these words: "Think before you speak. Read before you think!" Not bad advice. Many people need to do a little research before they become "experts." Helping someone learn to read, be a better reader, or be more knowledgeable certainly would be a good deed.
    A friend of mine was doing a good deed the other day when I stopped in. He was packaging some CDs to be sent to a lady who has vision problems, but no hearing problems, and she enjoys classical music. My friend's cousin had asked him if he had extra music to share. He did.
    Recycling things could be considered a good deed. Some snow plows are now made out of large, mining operation truck tires. Because they are mostly rubber, the tires are especially effective scraping slushy roads.
    A lady in Bavaria, Germany, has begun making yarn out of dog hair. Getting rid of some dog hair certainly puts her in the class of do good deeders.
    Thinking of people who do good deeds, made me think of today's nontraditional teachers — those who have gone into teaching later in life, in their 30s or 40s or 50s. These people have found that the rewards of teaching kids are worth more than a "big time" job with high salaries. Besides knowledge of their subjects, they also have a knowledge of "the world" through years of experience.
    Speaking of good deeds, I was the recipient of one last week. Jeff Keeler brought some packages of venison to the fish hatchery. Was I surprised when Janice, a hatchery employee, called and said, "You have some venison to pickup at the hatchery. It's in the freezer in the Rainbow Room." Thanks Jeff!
    Take a walk, use those signal lights, attempt to do good deeds whenever possible, and see what you notice while walking along Wildcat Boulevard.
    Page 2 of 2 - Russell Hively writes a weekly column for the Daily News.

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