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Neosho Daily News - Neosho, MO
  • Hay prices and turtles on the road

  • The morning glories are blooming in the ditch north of the Neosho High School Gymnasium. I see them each morning as I pass on my trek along Wildcat Boulevard. The blooms are white and beautiful. I wonder if they are native? It doesn't matter though, as I enjoy seeing them each day. Soon some other colored morning glories will add to the rainbow.
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  • The morning glories are blooming in the ditch north of the Neosho High School Gymnasium. I see them each morning as I pass on my trek along Wildcat Boulevard. The blooms are white and beautiful. I wonder if they are native? It doesn't matter though, as I enjoy seeing them each day. Soon some other colored morning glories will add to the rainbow.
    There are quite a few turtles on the streets and roads these days. I always wonder where they are trying to go. Some people stop and help them across. I saw a man stop to pick up a turtle near Ozark Bible Institute the other day. It was a snapping turtle. I hoped he knew what he was doing. Was he going to help it across the street or make turtle soup?
    Not long ago, I talked to a man who even stops to help worms cross the road when he sees them on the pavement or parking lots. He said that if he doesn't they will dry up and die before they reach the other side.
    His story reminded me of the old horseshoe crab story. The man was grabbing horseshoe crabs that crawled up on the beach and tossing them back into the ocean. Someone asked how he was helping when there were thousands and thousands more. He said, "Well it made a difference to this one," as he tossed it back out into the ocean.
    John Hobbs, McDonald County extension agent, had an interesting article in the latest extension newsletter about the cost of harvesting a large, round bale of hay. He estimated that the net costs about $11.50, the raking $2.25, the mowing about $5.45, and the fertilizer and land use about $30 per bale. This totals to about $50 per 1,200-pound bale. No wonder beef has gotten expensive.
    The area farmers and ranchers seem to be getting an abundant crop of hay this year. The big round bales are sitting in fields, filling barns, and lining up like soldiers in rows along fence lines. Farmers go to great lengths to protect the bales from the elements. Some encase them in long, white plastic tubes. Others stack them so they protect each other. I have even seen some bales covered by discarded semi-trailer tarps.
    I read somewhere that a man who had a car junk yard placed his round bales on old car bodies so they did not come in contact with the ground, which spoils the bottom of the bale.
    Take a walk, watch for creatures crossing the road including pedestrians, use those signal lights, and see what you notice while passing along Wildcat Boulevard.
    Russell Hively writes a weekly column for the Daily News.

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