In Matthew 11:27-30 Jesus is describing the burdens many bear. Many commentaries explain that in this particular case, Jesus is depicting the weight many of those listening would have felt, having great familiarity with the law and the overwhelming, or rather impossible expectations to keep the law fully.

In Matthew 11:27-30 Jesus is describing the burdens many bear.  Many commentaries explain that in this particular case, Jesus is depicting the weight many of those listening would have felt, having great familiarity with the law and the overwhelming, or rather impossible expectations to keep the law fully.  
His point is short and comes through like a gentle breeze of fresh air to those standing around who are feeling spiritually hopeless.  In verses 28-29 he says “Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.  Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.”  
This is a comforting and paradigm-changing passage for those who feel burdened as if their salvation depended upon their works.  
There are a number of points of conversation that could launch from these few sentences.  But what draws my attention at first is what Jesus calls us to do.  In place of our work, best efforts, worries and laboring Jesus directs us to take on his yoke.  Now I am one of the first to admit that I have little idea of what goes on in the world of farming and agriculture.  I grew up around small farms, and have great memories of being around animals, gardens, hauling hay.  But that was a long time ago.  If you needed help with your livestock or garden, I will no doubt be toward the bottom of your list.
Yet, to find peace and rest from the spiritual burdens of his listeners, Jesus prescribes to take on a yoke.  This is no ordinary yoke, and not just some random, different yoke.  We are to take on his yoke.  The yoke is a tool used on the necks of large animals in order to direct and control their actions to complete the task at hand.  They look heavy and uncomfortable, so why would Jesus prescribe a yoke a means of rest?
Simply, because we all must come to a place where we are trusting in the work he has already done and not our own.  
My prayer is that we would rest in the grace of Jesus’ work, and that we would welcome the discipline that his yoke provides.  He himself says there is much to be learned by letting him lead the way.  

Sean Pratt writes a column for the Neosho Daily News.