People living in this modern age of science and invention have seen advances in technology the world seemingly can’t live without. One is a navigation system the military used long before it went commercial: Global Positioning (GPS).

 People living in this modern age of science and invention have seen advances in technology the world seemingly can’t live without. One is a navigation system the military used long before it went commercial: Global Positioning (GPS).
     It is composed of a series of some 30 satellites orbiting 12,427 miles above our planet. How they operate in conjunction with relational components on the ground makes tracking people’s locations possible almost anywhere on Earth.
     Since GPS can provide directional assistance to motorists as they venture down the road, there is no longer the need to unfurl a cumbersome road map while enroute to a specific location.
     I rode with a friend to Arkansas this past weekend. He drove with his smart phone hooked up so he could obtain directions from the GPS. Simply by talking into it, he’d set the desired destination that enabled the GPS to determine the precise way of getting where we wanted to go, based on our current location.
     He placed a speaker on the dashboard so he could listen to a human-sounding, computerized voice directing him to every street and turn necessary to reach the place we wanted to visit. It even calculated the exact distance for each exit or turnoff along the way.
     Because we were talking with the radio playing in the background, we weren’t listening for the computer as we should have been at one point. This caused us to overshoot our exit by ten miles. Our inattention to the computer forced us to turn around and go back until reaching the right turnoff.
     Although the system never once said "please" or "thank you" to any of our actions along the way, it didn’t mention or chastise us for the mistake we made, either. Thankfully, unlike many annoying backseat drivers, it proved non-judgmental in that regard.
     How often have people prayed, "Lord, show me the way"? We want to go somewhere in life, for life to have purpose and meaning. We want answers to difficult situations as they arise. Therefore, we turn to God, asking for direction.
     God knows everything about us. He knows where we are at all times, whether physically, mentally, emotionally, or spiritually.
     He is willing and capable of giving us the directions we seek, based on our current needs. It’s just a matter of letting Him know what they are, and then having the patience to listen through the background noise of life long enough to hear Him as He speaks.

Mark Edmondson writes a column for the Neosho Daily News.