A way to increase awareness about the importance of being a bone marrow donor was emphasized during Friday's DKMS (the national bone marrow registry), the nonprofit leading the fight against blood cancer. The drive was held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Neosho's First Baptist Church.

A way to increase awareness about the importance of being a bone marrow donor was emphasized during Friday's DKMS (the national bone marrow registry), the nonprofit leading the fight against blood cancer. The drive was held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Neosho's First Baptist Church.
Open to anyone ages 18-55, the process to be put on the donor list was noninvasive.
"Basically someone will come if they want to donate, they will kind of get the information, learn what all is going to happen, and involved in the donation, then they will sign up with the registry, then they get a swab that is 30 seconds swab of each cheek a total of one minute and they are done. it is very simple," said Sara Massey, Neosho, who is also a local pharmacy student from the University of Missouri-Kanas City School of Pharmacy.
She hosted the bone marrow registration drive in honor of her mother, Jane, Massey, Neosho, who is a pharmacist and breast cancer survivor, was diagnosed with Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) in December 2016 and needs a lifesaving bone marrow transplant. Jane is fortunate that her siblings are a 100 percent match for a bone marrow donation, which she will receive in the coming months.
"This is really the only cure, so if you have leukemia, ...or MDS - which is what my mom has - all of those are blood cancers and blood is everywhere," said Sara. "So you just can't take a medication and it gets rid of everything, everywhere, so the only cure is the transplant. that is why it is really important of because a lot of people are suffering from that.
"Nearly 14,000 people do not find a donor each year," Sara said in an earlier interview. "If we can increase the number of people on the bone marrow registry, we can help decrease the number of people who do not receive a donor. The public can help save the life of many people all across the world. if we reach 10 people or 500 people, it is still more poeple on the registration that can potentially be a donor."

Registration
Anyone who wishes to register as a potential donor but is unable to attend the local drive can register online at www.dkms.org.

About DKMS
According to DKMS, 70 percent of people suffering from blood-related illnesses must rely on donors outside their families to save their life. Swabbing your cheek is all it takes to register as a potential donor. DKMS is an international nonprofit organization dedicated to eradicating blood cancers like Leukemia and other blood-related illnesses inspiring both men and women around the world to register as bone marrow and blood stem cell donors. DKMS is providing patients with a second chance at life, working closely with families from diagnosis to transplant and beyond. The donor journey begins with a swab of the cheek that takes less than 60 seconds and can be the action that leads to a lifesaving transplant. DKMS, originally founded in Germany in 1991 by Dr. Peter Harf, has organizations in Poland, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States. The U.S. office was started in 2004 and has registered over 800,000 people. To join the fight against blood cancer or for more information, please go to dkms.org.