"When it rains, it pours."
That was how artist Doug Hall described his current life and work. Not only has he gotten started on a new painting, but he has two big new projects, unlike any he has had before.

"When it rains, it pours."
That was how artist Doug Hall described his current life and work. Not only has he gotten started on a new painting, but he has two big new projects, unlike any he has had before.
Very soon a new mural featuring one of Hall's paintings will go up at Indigo Sky Casino near Seneca. His depiction of a Shawnee Indian, dressed for battle, will shortly be seen as a 9 x 12 foot mural which will grace a newly constructed addition to the casino.
The painting, titled "Battle Ready," was sold a few years ago at the Midwest Gathering of Artists in Carthage. The buyer was a lady from out west who owned a casino. She paid about $8,000 for the work.
The buyer has since passed away and her children own the original painting.
"I wish I still had it," Hall lamented.
The new mural is composed of ceramic tiles and, Hall thinks it will be placed in the passageway between the two towers of the casino.
"This is my first mural on tile so I am learning a lot. Fortunately, it has been easy for me because my work is already done. Other people are producing the mural and installing it," Hall said. "But it's a whole new concept for me…a new trail of thought."
Hall's work will be very familiar to patrons of the casino and restaurant. Several of his paintings hang throughout the hotel lobby and in business offices at Indigo Sky.
Ironically, Chief Glenna Wallace of the Eastern Shawnee, is responsible for Hall's other project. This also involves Scott Bentley, the former superintendent of the George Washington Carver National Monument near Diamond, Mo.
Bentley is now superintendent of the River Raisin National Battlefield near Monroe, Michigan. This battlefield commemorates the January 1813 battles in which Tecumseh, the great Shawnee chief, had his greatest victory. Tecumseh, who was eventually was killed in the War of 1812, is highly revered by the tribe, almost the equivalent of George Washington to his people.
Bentley and Chief Wallace have known each other for years. When Wallace was in Michigan recently, she told Bentley about the new mural and all the art Hall has done using Shawnee Indians as his theme.
Now Bentley has contacted Hall, and they are working out a plan to sell his art work at the battlefield museum in Michigan. Seven pieces of Hall's work are being considered by the battlefield for their gift shop.
Bentley was in Neosho a few months ago to meet with Hall and view his work which is displayed at his gallery south of Neosho. Bentley will be returning to the area soon to see the new mural in Seneca and to firm up a deal with Hall for selling his art at the battlefield in Michigan.
"I'm excited about this," Hall said. "I'm going to make it happen."