WYANDOTTE, Okla. — "He's our artist," said Glenna Wallace, Chief of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma, speaking about Doug Hall on Friday evening.

WYANDOTTE, Okla. — "He's our artist," said Glenna Wallace, Chief of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma, speaking about Doug Hall on Friday evening.
The tribe celebrated a Doug Hall mural at the ribbon cutting for their new hotel/banquet building Friday, September 29. The mural, in ceramic tile, stands 12 feet high and 9 feet wide and depicts an Osage Indian prepared to do battle.
Titled "Battle Ready," the mural was chosen by the tribe to be placed in the entry of the new building.
Asked why, of all his art that features Shawnee Indians and culture, the tribe chose this particular work, Hall, a resident of Pineville with an art gallery in Neosho, said, "I think this painting may have been chosen because it is a single figure. The man has the clothing, moccasins, musket and all the things that an Indian at that time would have had. It's not a scenery piece."
Noting his love of the outdoors and frontier life, Chief Wallace asked Hall to tell the story of how, as a 14-year-old boy, he had gotten his first flintlock rifle. Hall told the humorous story of his secret two-day trip with his 18-year-old brother, Alan, to buy the rifle he had his heart set on.
Hall thought it would be a short trip to Union City, Tennessee, and that he and Alan would be back in Neosho before school was out, as he was playing hooky. Of course it took two days and cost Doug a few extra bucks to buy their supper, which consisted of a soda and a bag of potato chips.
When the store that had the gun opened for business, the clerk would not sell the gun to Doug, a 14-year-old. His brother took Doug's money and "bought " the rifle.
This tale is told partially on a plaque beside the big mural.
Having such a large mural in tile is a first for Hall, and he had not seen it on the wall until the dedication on Friday.
Speaking about the mural, Hall said, "I never in a million years would have though that one of my paintings would be tile mural in such a beautiful building."
At the dedication, Chief Wallace presented Hall with a hand-made walking stick. The stick is made of persimmon wood and has a honeysuckle vine that had grown around the persimmon. The walking stick was made by the famous potter and artist, Richard Zane Smith.
In a special surprise, Wallace presented Doug Hall's mother, Rebecca, with a beautiful shawl for her lifelong support of her artist son.
The mural is available for viewing anytime in the hallway between the two large buildings at Indigo Sky, located on US Highway 60, near the Missouri/Oklahoma state line.