Junior and senior students at Neosho High School had the opportunity to learn some potentially life saving skills at a special clinic on emergency medical topics last week.

Junior and senior students at Neosho High School had the opportunity to learn some potentially life saving skills at a special clinic on emergency medical topics last week.
Physical education teacher Brandi Arthur planned the event in cooperation with Missouri Southern State University's Department of Emergency Services. Students had the opportunity to visit five stations, each with a different topic for information and some hands-on experience.
"It's a great opportunity for our students to have training that could help them save lives," Arthur said. "These opportunities for hands-on training are awesome because students are motivated to learn new skills when they see the real-life uses."
Associate Professor and Director of Emergency Medical Services at MSSU, Ted Lee, and other MSSU staff members provided the training event free of charge.
The event ran from 8 a.m. through 2:30 p.m. Juniors attended during their government class while senior students attended during their senior English class time. Students spent their class period time rotating to each of the stations. The stations included Hands Only CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation), AED (Automated external defibrillation)  usage, Choking First Aid, EpiPen usage, and Stop The Bleed.
"These are all life saving stations," Lee told each group of students. "You might be able to save a life or your friend might be able to save your life with what you learn here today."
At each station, EMS personnel demonstrated first aid and life saving tips to the students.
At the Stop The Bleed station, students gathered to learn the use of a tourniquet and were able to practice those skills on a mannequin. Although it's a practical application, students saw a different aspect.
"Yeah, I guess it's fun," junior Christopher Henderson said.
Chad Williams, another EMS instructor at MSSU, instructed students at the AED station.
This is the first year that the event has been held at NHS but it may be something that may be repeated since it offers life-saving skills that can be applied in real life situations. Students practiced on
"CPR given immediately after cardiac arrest can double or even triple the victim's chance of survival," Arthur said. "The method of CPR the students learned is a hands-only method. People are more likely to provide first aid to those in need if they aren't required to have mouth to mouth contact."
The one day presentation provided valuable information to students, timely during the holidays and any season with the potential to save a life.