Heavy rain, a little thunder, and flood warnings weren't enough to keep bluegrass enthusiasts away from the 2nd annual Bluegrass Showcase held at the Civic in historic downtown Neosho on Saturday.

Heavy rain, a little thunder, and flood warnings weren't enough to keep bluegrass enthusiasts away from the 2nd annual Bluegrass Showcase held at the Civic in historic downtown Neosho on Saturday.
Fans of all ages arrived to tap their feet and clap their hands to the traditional music.
Twenty-one bands participated in the day long event which began at 9 a.m. and ended at 8:30 p.m. There were two sessions. The opening session ended at 2:30 p.m. and the closing session began after an hour's intermission at 3:30 p.m. During the intermission, there were jam sessions.
Throughout the day, those in attendance had the opportunity to visit several food trucks parked outside the venue, including the Sunshine Shack, a popular local food truck operated by Aaron Crum, serving up their popular Shackwitches including burgers, pulled pork, and grilled cheese.
One of the bands performing during the opening session was Southern Tradition, a six-member bluegrass band hailing from northwest Arkansas.
"We are a bluegrass band from the northwest Arkansas area," band member and vocalist Jeff Bond said. "We are committed to wholesome values."
The band includes Bond and Justin Bond, who both play guitar. Rick Evans is the group's bass man, Bobby Glen is on mandolin, Tony Langley plays banjo, and the youngest member, Isaac Orvin plays fiddle.
Southern Tradition formed their group in 2014 and each of the members lives in Northwest Arkansas.
"The character and talent of these guys makes it an honor to be a part of this group," Evans said.
The band is known for their bluegrass and bluegrass gospel sound. They play a combination of traditional tunes and some original songs.
They performed one of these, 'Rain, Rain Go Away' from their CD with the same title.
"We are going to play another one," Jeff Bond said, as he introduced the number. "This one is an original number and it's on our new CD."
The refrain, 'rain, rain, go away," proved to be popular as outside the rain continued to come down outside.
"I feel blessed to be playing with such a talented group of guys," Bond said.
Orvin, at 17, is the youngest member of the group but he's played the fiddle since the age of 8. Orvin plans to attend the University of Arkansas as a full-time student beginning in the fall of 2018.
Southern Tradition performs around the area and sometimes performs in Neosho at Pam's Place.
The crowds who attended were enthusiastic throughout the day, despite the weather outside.
Paul Richardson, City of Neosho Public Relations Director and Events Coordinator indicated he prepared as much as possible before the event, the second. The number of bands doubled from the first year and the event is slated to become an annual event for the city of Neosho.