Like a scene from a Charlie Russell painting come to life, the old West was the center of attention Sunday at Doug Hall's Log Cabin Gallery located south of Neosho. All the elements were there: the cowboys, the Indians, the food over the fire, the log cabin, the boots, the belt buckles, and even the black powder. But most of all, there were the Doug Hall paintings.

Like a scene from a Charlie Russell painting come to life, the old West was the center of attention Sunday at Doug Hall's Log Cabin Gallery located south of Neosho. All the elements were there: the cowboys, the Indians, the food over the fire, the log cabin, the boots, the belt buckles, and even the black powder. But most of all, there were the Doug Hall paintings.
 The event is really two events, a commemoration of a tornado that destroyed Hall's first log cabin 18 years ago, and an annual Open House to thank his many friends and customers.
No one counted the visitors but Hall said, "The parking lot was full all day. I don't know how many people came."
Kay Stich came from Cherryvale, Kansas, to join the celebration. She said she and her husband have admired Hall’s art for many years. The couple own several pieces that they have bought and several that her husband has won at black powder shoots when a piece of Hall art was the prize.
At the Sunday Open House, Stich bought four of the new tiles that display copies of Hall's work and one coffee mug with his work.
The winner of the 18th Tornado Anniversary black powder shoot was Rod Brimm, also from Kansas.
"This was our 18th anniversary, but it doesn't seem that long ago that a tornado destroyed everything. It almost seems like yesterday. But I believe it was a true act of God," Hall said.
It was at that time that Hall had to make a decision about his life's work. He chose to dedicate himself fully to being an artist.
"I decided I would try to support myself with art and if it didn't work out, then I could say I tried. Thankfully, it worked out," Hall smiled.
Rebecca Hall, Doug's mother and number one supporter, spent the day serving coffee and pie and greeting everyone who came in the door.
"It's been a wonderful day," Rebecca said. "Even the cold weather didn't stop people from coming."
Several old friends worked the cash register, made the chili outdoors in a tent, served coffee and greeted guests who just kept pouring in. Others supervised the black powder shoot.
Yes, it was cold, but eventually everyone got inside the log cabin gallery to see Hall's work and enjoy the food. And everyone seemingly had a great time and were happy to be there—but as we all know, that's the cowboy way.