There is nothing like a job well done, and the bonus of a job well done is being rewarded for your efforts. Acknowledging good work is why they give out ribbons at the Newton County Fair. Whether the ribbon is blue or green or red or purple, it's something to be proud of.

There is nothing like a job well done, and the bonus of a job well done is being rewarded for your efforts. Acknowledging good work is why they give out ribbons at the Newton County Fair. Whether the ribbon is blue or green or red or purple, it's something to be proud of.
Each year there are dozens of people who bring hundreds of entries to be judged at the fair and hundreds of ribbons are awarded. Those who are responsible for giving the ribbons take their jobs very seriously.
Rhonda Helm is the fair's Indoor Superintendent, the person responsible for finding good judges to examine every item that is entered in the indoor category. The Indoor competition is primarily everything that is not an animal. Home canned food, flowers, paintings, woodworking items, pies and cakes, quilts, leather work, field crops and much, much more are within this category.
The category has competition between people in 4-H, FFA, Boy and Girl Scouts, and the general public. Everyone is trying to catch the judges' eye.
According to Helm, the judges are local but they are experts in their field.
"We have Master Gardeners who volunteer with the plants, a professional photographer judges that category, and we have many teachers or former teachers throughout the judging," Helm says. "They all take the job seriously."
Each category has certain rules and criteria to follow, and the judges stick to these rules and make their decisions based on them.
With many categories to choose from, Helm says that most popular categories are Hobby Crafts and Home Arts, categories that have been part of the fair for many years. Contestants have a chance to test their skills while making Christmas or Halloween decorations that they will use in their own home.
This year, the Indoor category has 2500 entries and will be housed in two large buildings on fairgrounds. The judging is held on Tuesday and, on Wednesday, the public is invited in to see the results. When the doors open, Helm says a pretty good crowd shows up to see the exhibits and learn who got what ribbon.
Helm became the Indoor Superintendent shortly after the death of Roy Jean Carter in 2004. Carter was the long time Extension Agent for Newton County and was the Indoor Superintendent.
The public is invited to visit the Indoor exhibit at the Newton County Fair and see the 2500 items that have been made by some talented people.
Visitors will see that many exhibits are indeed a "job well done."