Ernie Trumbly, along with Del and Norma Hampton, met with the Neosho Lions Club on Friday, August 10, to make Lions members aware of what the Civil Air Patrol has done in the past and still does today.

Ernie Trumbly, along with Del and Norma Hampton, met with the Neosho Lions Club on Friday, August 10, to make Lions members aware of what the Civil Air Patrol has done in the past and still does today.
Trumbly was the main spokesman and told some of the history of the Civil Air Patrol (CAP). The CAP was founded in 1941 and was made part of the United States security forces in World War II, working especially along the major oceans.
One of the members' duties in the war was to watch for German submarines which lurked in the oceans near the United States coastline. Before the war ended, some Civil Air Patrol planes were armed and actually sank two enemy submarines.
In 1946, when the Army Air Corps became the United States Air Force, the Civil Air Patrol was taken under it wings.
 During his presentation, Trumbly pointed out the CAP trains people in search and rescue for crashed planes and lost individuals. He mentioned that in most parts of the United States today, finding a downed plane has been made more simple because nearly everyone has a cell phone.
 “If there is a crash, someone has seen it,” he said.
Because pilots are much in demand, the Civil Air Patrol is always recruiting young cadets. Potential cadets must be between12-18 years of age. They are trained to be part of the search and rescue units and are guaranteed flying time. Most young cadets have a chance to fly five or more times.
Del Hampton said that belonging to both the Civil Air Patrol and high school ROTC programs is a wonderful, but busy, way to work into flying. Locally, one of the requirements is an encampment time which sometimes is held at Camp Crowder.
He said, "One of the most important aspects of today's Civil Air Patrol is the recruitment of pilots."
If a young person remains with the Civil Air Patrol, he or she will start with an advanced rank when entering the regular armed services.
Another job of the Civil Air Patrol is aiding with disasters such as tornados or flooding.
The CAP is a non-profit organization and no one gets paid. Members work to help young people learn flying skills, aid in disasters, and is especially good with search and rescue.
The Joplin(NCR-MO143) branch of the Civil Air Patrol has a learning center in the old Joplin Airport. The group was also instrumental in refurbishing the Air Force Training T-37 airplane which was given to Neosho many years ago. The restored plane now sits atop a pedestal at the Neosho Hugh Robinson Airport.
The Lions were told that any young person with a desire to fly or to become a pilot should check out the Civil Air Patrol. The Joplin patrol has had one cadet accepted to the Air Force Academy and one to West Point.
The patrol group was invited to the meeting by Lion Paul Jones, a former Teledyne employee with 50 years of interest in flying.