Since they were born, most every child loved hearing stories, either in school or at bedtime. It is something they never outgrow. Stories can be formal, as in a book, or just random like the stories told ad lib by our grandparents and our funny old Uncle Charlie.

Since they were born, most every child loved hearing stories, either in school or at bedtime. It is something they never outgrow. Stories can be formal, as in a book, or just random like the stories told ad lib by our grandparents and our funny old Uncle Charlie.

Because everyone still loves stories, the George Washington Carver National Monument will hold its 3rd annual storytelling days on Friday and Saturday, August 24-25. The lineup of storytellers is very deep and very broad, but each will tell stories that celebrate American history and culture.

On Friday evening, two storytellers will spins their tales. Mike and Nancee Micham, who farm near Taneyville, MO, will use both story and song in their performances. Their program centers around traditional American music. Besides taking their show on the road, the Michams often perform in Branson and entertain visitors from around the world. This performance begins at 6 p.m. on Friday, August 24.

In a Chautuaqua-like performance, Doug Mishler will bring his one-man performance as Thomas Hart Benton to the stage. Neosho residents are well familiar with Mr. Benton, as he was born here in 1889 and went on to become one of the most famous muralist of his time. Mishler brings out the best of the sometimes ornery Benton, who was known for his wicked charm and his great love of Missouri, especially the Ozarks. Mishler performs immediately after the Michams.

Storytime continues at 11 a.m. on Saturday and runs until 3 p.m.

The first performance, at 11 a.m., will feature Loretta Washington with "Where Would I Be Without Thee." These stories about enslaved women are African American tales that are educational and inspiring to people of all races and all ages. Ms. Washington says that her goal in performing is to "Always weave a positive message in everything I do."

Next on the playbill will be Betty Jean Steinhouser, performing as novelist Willa Cather. Ms. Cather was a widely acclaimed novelist who was born in Virginia, but came to Nebraska at age nine and studied at the University of Nebraska. She penned her greatest novels, "O'Pioneers" and "My Antonia," on her memories of the Cornhusker State. Ms. Steinhouser has spent nearly 30 years touring and portraying women of letters.

After Ms. Steinhouser's performance, Keith Henley will portray George Washington Carver and will honor the 75th anniversary of Dr. Carver's death and the establishment of the Carver National Monument. Henley is a professional touring actor who portrays many famous African Americans, including Langston Hughes and Dr. Martin Luther, Jr.

The final performance will feature the Emmy award winner, Bobby Norfolk, giving his story of the national pastime. In "Snowball: The Negro Baseball Leagues," he tells the personal and professional triumphs and tragedies which befell such great players as Satchell Paige, Cool Papa Bell and other great players in the Negro leagues.

All performances are free to the public. The stage will be in the lower level of the Visitor Center at the park, which is located two miles west of Diamond an "V" highway, and one-quarter mile south on Carver Road.

Storytelling Days is sponsored by the Carver Birthplace Association with support from the Joplin Convention & Visitors Bureau.