Grant Langmaid has a lot of experience with trout, but as he settles into a staff position at the Neosho National Fish Hatchery, he still has much to learn.

Grant Langmaid has a lot of experience with trout, but as he settles into a staff position at the Neosho National Fish Hatchery, he still has much to learn.

In his previous job, he was involved with Gila trout, a small number of federally endangered species, found in the mountains of New Mexico. Now he shifts to the popular and widely distributed rainbow trout which are raised here in Neosho.

A native of Iowa, Langmaid spent six years in the U.S, Marines, which he says was "…a lot tougher job."

After his service in the Marines, with no idea of a major, he went to college in Oklahoma. Taking a student internship at a state hatchery in Durant, Okla., he found what he wanted to do. He became a fish biologist and he loves the job.

His wife is also a fish biologist, but is now turning to teaching. She is finishing up her education degree and will be hunting a teaching position.

Life is very different for the Langmaids here in Missouri. "In New Mexico, we lived in a town of about 300 people. It was a 40-mile drive to a supermarket. It's so nice to have places to eat and shop in Neosho," Langmaid said.

Since arriving in Neosho, he has helped with mowing, loaded a state truck with fish and is helping move fish around as the hatchery gets back on track after the big repairs to the "spring box."

One thing is for sure, Langmaid is adding to his knowledge of different trout species, and he is looking forward to the job.