I remember as a child, getting our first television, a big floor console with a round black and white picture tube. I remember the TV repairman coming out several times a year to replace vacuum tubes and re-adjust the picture. I remember standing in the crowded basement of a commercial store in my neighborhood one New Year’s Day to see the first commercial color TV and a broadcast of the Rose Bowl Parade.

I remember as a child, getting our first television, a big floor console with a round black and white picture tube. I remember the TV repairman coming out several times a year to replace vacuum tubes and re-adjust the picture. I remember standing in the crowded basement of a commercial store in my neighborhood one New Year’s Day to see the first commercial color TV and a broadcast of the Rose Bowl Parade.
Over the intervening years I learned a bit about electronics by building several items from Heathkits and ultimately one of their color TVs that was pretty much state-of-the-art for the time. It contained numerous carefully soldered printed circuit boards and hundreds of transistors that took weeks to assemble. Today that circuitry fits in a single microchip or two and drives light emitting diode (LED) screens. I remember being impressed as I watched an early version of the Apple computer draw a graph on the screen in a split second, automatically scaling the XY axis that I had so carefully figured, measured and constructed with a ruler and paper in my science classes. Today's desktop computers are massively more powerful than the most powerful military computer of the 1960s, and your mobile phone has more processing power than the best desktop computers of a decade ago

Read the complete story in the Feb. 7 print edition of the Neosho Daily News.