The perfectly clear mornings with a large moon were delightful a week or so back. The moon beams made the darkness of Wildcat Boulevard brighter, as I walked along. The sky was a deep, deep blue, and the stars shined like oversized Christmas lights.

The perfectly clear mornings with a large moon were delightful a week or so back. The moon beams made the darkness of Wildcat Boulevard brighter, as I walked along. The sky was a deep, deep blue, and the stars shined like oversized Christmas lights.
I often think of my years in room 24 as I pass by the front of the school each morning. At that time nearly the entire west wall was windows. With no air conditioning, the windows were usually open.
One student developed an allergic reaction when she came into my rom. She would sometimes sneeze for the entire hour. I asked her if she had some kind of problem, but she remarked she only sneezed in my room.
A couple weeks later she came bounding in with the news her doctors had discovered she was allergic to the bushes outside my windows. She took some kind of medicine that fall and when the windows were closed in cold weather she had no sneezing problems.
Some things seen outside the windows of Room 24 were a mystery. At least once each spring a special car, a long metallic brown Lincoln with gold instead of chrome covering much of its body, would go through one of the fast food places across the street. I wondered why this person selected the drive-through to get food or drink? Secondly, I was curious who this person was? Thirdly, why was he/she in Neosho? I never found out.
One event which caused some talk among the students in Room 24 was when my student teacher was picked up for lunch by her husband who drove an ambulance. During the last year of my teaching, an OATS van was parked outside my window one May morning. I thought, perhaps, they were coming for me.
Open windows invited other guests into Room 24. Wasps, bees, yellow jackets, and other flying insects were major disturbances to students who were studying, reading, or writing. One September a sophomore girl caught a bee in her hands, cupped it carefully, and asked if she could throw it out the open window. This led to a discussion of the theory that insects won’t sting if a person is holding his/her breath. One student testified that holding one’s breath was not a deterrent. On a dare, he’d tried it, and lost.
Once, one of my seniors needed only my class to graduate. He didn’t concentrate much on any class but mine that last semester. He decided he would not take any final exams except English. As it turned out, he needed to sell cattle on final exam day. That hot May morning, he loaded his cattle into a horse trailer, hooked it to his pickup, drove to school, parked outside the open windows of Room 24, came inside, and took his final exam.
Neosho High School had a closed campus; students were not allowed to leave the school grounds, especially for lunch. One day, two young ladies decided to sneak away for some fast food instead of lunchroom fare. Their escapade was fine, until they had an accident on Neosho Boulevard outside of Room 24 while they were rushing back, so they wouldn’t be late to their next class.
Take a walk, write down special incidents at your work place for later reference, use your signal lights, watch for pedestrians, and see what you notice while passing along Wildcat Boulevard.    
Russell Hively writes a weekly column for the Daily News.