I heard someone whistling a tune as I walked along Wildcat boulevard the other morning. It was a happy tune, and I thought this song was coming from someone who is happy with his work.

I heard someone whistling a tune as I walked along Wildcat boulevard the other morning. It was a happy tune, and I thought this song was coming from someone who is happy with his work.
As I walked, I determined it was one of the BBQ guys who start their BBQ grill cooking early each morning on Neosho Boulevard.
Whenever I hear someone whistling, I cannot help but think of the Walt Disney movie Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. This 1937 movie had Snow White first sing the song(accompanied by the forest animals) when she discovered the empty cabin the dwarfs lived in. She thought that if she cleaned up the place, the occupants might let her stay there.
She was right and in time became great friends with each and every dwarf. For some reason I think the dwarfs also sang the song when they were going to work and coming home.
At one of the eating establishments Kay and I frequent, one of the waitresses sings under her breath as she goes about her business. I asked her about it, and she said she sang because she was happy with her work.
My dad was a whistler and singer. He did most of his singing when he was doing field work. On still, windless days, a person could hear him singing above the sounds of the tractor and whatever piece of equipment he was pulling.
Besides singing and whistling, he also would yodel as he drove along. One of the neighborhood ladies said she enjoyed his yodeling when she would hear it. My dad had always wanted to be a farmer, was a farmer all his life, and was always happy at what he did.
He also liked listening to country music and especially liked it when Eddie Arnold would sing and yodel Cattle Call or Patsy Montana would perform I Want to be a Cowboy’s Sweetheart.
Kay once did a newspaper article about a man who whistled at work in Home Depot in Joplin. He was taught to whistle by his grandmother and in time made whistling a mission in his life. Most of his tunes were Christian, and he used his whistling as a mission in many churches throughout the area.
Sadly. he was killed in the big Joplin tornado.
I, too, tried to sing and whistle when I worked in the fields. The summers before my sophomore, junior, and senior years of high school I cultivated for a man who farmed many acres. Driving a cultivator can be boring, but a job where you had to always pay close attention so you don't plow out the precious corn plants.
During these long hours in the field, I would sing and whistle to help pass the time. One song seemed to blend in with the sound of the 620 John Deere tractor I was driving. It was as if the notes of the song harmonized with the exhaust sounds. That may sound strange but it gave me pleasure at the time, and I sang the song again and again.
Take a walk, whistle or sing under your breath as you work each day, be happy at your work, use those signal lights, watch for pedestrians, and see what you notice while passing along your own Wildcat Boulevard.  
 

 
 
 Russell Hively writes a weekly column for the Daily News.