The last few weeks have certainly been a time of change each morning as I prepare for my Wildcat Boulevard walks. One day it was nearly 70 degrees when I stepped out of the house, and a couple days later the temperatures had dropped into the 20s.

The last few weeks have certainly been a time of change each morning as I prepare for my Wildcat Boulevard walks. One day it was nearly 70 degrees when I stepped out of the house, and a couple days later the temperatures had dropped into the 20s.
Like the changes of weather, world happenings are always changing. Recently newscasts told how London, England buses are now partially propelled by coffee grounds.
A company collects coffee grounds from coffee houses and processes the oil from the  grounds. This oil is mixed with the fuel used to run London buses. Now the English people and their buses will be powered by coffee.
There has been some problem with cadence calls of the military. There has been some attempt to control the cadence language which can be quite risqué.
I personally liked to march to cadence calls and found some of the calls to be rather interesting. I was in an airborne basic training outfit in Fort Leonard Wood, even though I never went to jump school. Most of our cadence calls had to do with those who were going to be jumping out of airplanes.
I read that recently a neighborhood in Seattle, Washington, lost its electrical power because of a large salmon. It seems that an osprey caught a large salmon and could no longer hold it in its talons. The fish fell on some power lines and shorted them out, knocking out the electricity.
The Seattle fish market is famous for fish sellers throwing fish, but no one expected problems with osprey(fish hawks) tossing fish around and interrupting electrical power.
On the farm scene, I recently read that Oklahoma has the biggest cotton crop since 1933. Oklahoma is now the fourth highest cotton producer in the United States, with about one million bales of cotton grown in the state this year. This is twice what was grown a decade ago.
The report stated there were several reasons for this large crop: good prices, good weather, adequate water, and better genetics of the plants.
We visited Southwest Oklahoma a few years back to see the cotton fields. My wife Kay lived on a cotton farm early in her life. She wanted to see the area at harvest time. Her family moved in about 1950, and she had never been back.
An interesting fact I recently read was that the 25-34 year old population of farmers has grown over two percent in recent years. The article said that many of these young people had first joined the working world and decided they would rather work at the slower pace on a farm.
Many of these young farmers are involved with organic farming and the directly from farmer to consumer way of doing business that continues to grow in the United States.
We realize there was extensive home damage in both Florida and Texas this past year because of the hurricanes. I recently read that 63,000 recreational boats were part of the damage. The boats were either severely damaged, lost at sea, or destroyed.
Take a walk, use those signal lights, watch for pedestrians, be alert for osprey carrying fish, wear lots of cotton, and see what you notice while passing along Wildcat Boulevard.
 
 Russell Hively writes a weekly column for the Daily News.