I was thinking about the Layman’s League services the other morning as I walked along Wildcat Boulevard. Layman’s League has existed now for 71 years. It has very little structure and is an example of men in community churches uniting to celebrate Christmas.

I was thinking about the Layman’s League services the other morning as I walked along Wildcat Boulevard. Layman’s League has existed now for 71 years. It has very little structure and is an example of men in community churches uniting to celebrate Christmas.
Each day, the speaker tells the audience “What Christmas Means to Me.” Each morning a speaker shares his thoughts, and none of them are the same. Attending is an inspiring experience.
One thing I noticed this year that at the gathering before the service no one was looking at his cell phone—no one was texting. The men were talking, laughing, and enjoying each other’s company.
In December of 2017, Buck Knives, of Post Falls, Idaho, made their 1.5 millionth knife. It was a model 119, a special hunting knife that the company has made for 75 years. What a fine tradition for a fine company.
Have you noticed the winter wrens are back? They appear late each fall and spend the winter with us. Our winter wrens like to flitter in the bushes by our compost piles. They are not as noisy as the house wrens we have here in the summer.
Yet, the winter wrens are as nervous and constantly moving like their cousins the house wrens.
My grandparents Hively had vines growing on the railing of their back porch. The house wrens liked to build nests in the vines. The nests were located so my grandparents could watch them when they sat out on the porch in the evening.
They watched the nests being built, the eggs being laid, the birds setting on the eggs, the tiny little wrens being born, and them leaving the nest for the first time. All grandpa and grandma had to do was to sit still and be quiet.
The killdeer have returned to the Neosho High School area again. They take up residence each year on the football fields and parking lots. I don’t see them very often as it is dark when I walk, but I hear them as they are frightened by my approach. I wonder why they don’t go further south, as some days in the winter here in Neosho can be quite uncomfortable.
I have been fond of killdeer all my life. They would nest in the corn fields when the corn plants were just peaking out of the ground. The babies looked like little puffs of brown and white cotton on top of two long legs.
Observing things in nature has always been of interest to me. The other day I scared a nighthawk into flight. It was resting on the ground and thundered skyward when I walked by. I wondered how many people have ever seen a nighthawk on the ground as I have been lucky enough to.
Take a walk, enjoy watching nature, use your signal lights, watch for pedestrians, and see what you notice while walking along Wildcat Boulevard.     
    

 Russell Hively writes a weekly column for the Daily News.