I was thinking about my Christmas morning walk along Wildcat Boulevard as I strode along a couple weeks later. There was very little traffic on Neosho Boulevard and no foot traffic on Christmas day. As I walked around the parking lot at the Neosho High School Agriculture Building, I heard a radio playing, as it usually is.

I was thinking about my Christmas morning walk along Wildcat Boulevard as I strode along  a couple weeks later. There was very little traffic on Neosho Boulevard and no foot traffic on Christmas day. As I walked around the parking lot at the Neosho High School Agriculture Building, I heard a radio playing, as it usually is.
The FFA and Ag students leave a radio on in the green house. On Christmas morning though, I was moved by the song “O Holy Night” being sung as I walked by. The song was a strong reminder of what Christmas is really about.
In the 1950s there was a great deal of research about plants doing better if they had music piped in. I don’t know if the Neosho FFA kids are trying this with their green house plants. I wonder if Christmas carols are more enlightening to the plants. I know hearing O Holy Night was uplifting to me.
At the end of my column, I usually remind people to use the signal lights on their cars. Using signal lights help the other drivers know what you are going to do. Recently, I learned I must include another suggestion: Turn on the lights on foggy days.
One day we drove to Seneca in the fog. I met five other cars that did not have their lights on. Some of them seemed to pop out of the fog. Remember the lights are not for you, but for others to see you.
Sometimes I feel people do not turn on their lights early enough in the evening. They can see all right, but others cannot see them, especially on those cars that are the same color as the highway.
I appreciate that General Motors has all their vehicles outfitted with “running lights.”  I also know that in Canada all vehicles must have their lights on all the time. Driving with lights makes sense.
Because we have two railroads running through Neosho, a train can be heard almost all the time. One morning, one train had a railcar with a bad bearing. The wheel squealed loudly as it rolled along.
I don’t know what the railroad does to detect bad bearings today. The railroad has few bad bearing now that it has roller bearing axles on all the railroad cars. In olden days, a man rode in the caboose and watched to see if a wheel bearing was going out. If you ever wondered why a caboose a little space stuck out on its sides, it was so a person could watch from this spot to detect overheated wheel bearings.
If a bearing went bad, it got hot and started a small fire in the grease box located at the end of each wheel bearing. This gave us the phrase “hot boxes” which we use to describe other things today.
Take a walk, look around, listen to sounds, use your signal lights, always drive with your lights on, watch for pedestrians, appreciate all that trains haul, and see what you notice while walking along Wildcat Boulevard.  

 
 Russell Hively writes a weekly column for the Daily News.