At the Memorial Middle School in Joplin, Missouri on October 9, 2006, a 13 year old student, armed with a rifle and a handgun, began shooting. His rifle jammed after firing one shot. Hearing the shot, the school principal located the shooter, escorted him from the building, and turned him over to police. No one was killed or wounded.

At the Memorial Middle School in Joplin, Missouri on October 9, 2006, a 13 year old student, armed with a rifle and a handgun, began shooting. His rifle jammed after firing one shot. Hearing the shot, the school principal located the shooter, escorted him from the building, and turned him over to police. No one was killed or wounded.
At the Ward Parkway Target Store in Kansas City, Missouri on April 29, 2007, a man armed with a rifle, shot an officer after being pulled over near the Target store. He drove into the Target parking lot and continued shooting as he ran into the building. Two people were killed; eight were wounded, including one police officer. The shooter was killed by police.
At the Modine Manufacturing Company in Jefferson City, Missouri on July 1, 2003, a man armed with a handgun, began shooting co-workers in the Modine Manufacturing Company building. Three people were killed; five were wounded. The shooter fled the premises and then committed suicide during an exchange of gunfire with police.
These are three of the active shooter incidents that were included in a Federal Bureau of Investigation 2014 study which analyzed 160 shootings that occurred in the United States between 2000 and 2013.  These active shooter incidents resulted in 486 victims killed and 557 wounded.
The three Missouri incidents are typical in many respects.  They occurred in areas that shooters most often target.  Businesses like malls and work places, along with schools accounted for 70% of the locations.  The highest fatality rates occurred in school settings, with Virginia Polytechnic Institute and Sandy Hook Elementary leading the death toll.
The way in which these Missouri incidents ended was also typical.  Fifty-three percent of the 160 incidents ended on the shooter’s initiative— sometimes when the shooter committed suicide or stopped shooting, and other times when the shooter fled the scene, as in the Jefferson City incident.  In 28.1% of the incidents, law enforcement and the shooter exchanged gunfire, as in the Kansas City incident.  And In 21 incidents (13.1%), the situation ended after unarmed citizens safely and successfully restrained the shooter, as in the Joplin incident.
But where was the “good guy with the gun” when these 160 active shootings were occurring?  There was one.  On May 25, 2008 after a man used a handgun to kill two and wound two at the Player’s Bar and Grill in Winnemucca, Nevada. The shooter was killed by a citizen with a valid firearm permit.
The reasoning behind the “good guy with a gun” theory is that a well-armed citizenry will deter mass shootings. According to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, U.S. gun-makers produced nearly 11 million guns in 2013, the year after the Sandy Hook elementary school massacre. That's twice as many as they made in 2010.
But as the number of weapons available increased, so did the number of active shootings.  An average of 6.4 incidents occurred in the first 7 years studied.  That increased to an average of 16.4 incidents in the last 7 years.  There was no corresponding increase in “good guys with a gun” coming to the rescue.
 What does this mean for Missourians? Current Missouri law requires no licenses, permits, or registration to own, conceal carry or openly carry firearms.  There are also no background checks, which allows ample opportunity for more “bad guys with a gun”.  
As Missouri law makers continue to legislate away all protections against gun violence except for the “good guy with the gun”, citizens should pray that legislators have gotten it right.  Our very lives may depend on it!

Susanna Smith writes a column for the Neosho Daily News.