Every time I go to George Washington Carver National Monument, I learn something new. A few years back - well probably 30 years ago - I found out that Carver loved art and even learned to paint while on the Moses Carver Farm. Even though Carver would go into the scientist fame, he never lost his love of art.

Every time I go to George Washington Carver National Monument, I learn something new. A few years back - well probably 30 years ago - I found out that Carver loved art and even learned to paint while on the Moses Carver Farm. Even though Carver would go into the scientist fame, he never lost his love of art.
So with that in mind, this Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., the monument will host its annual Art in the Park. (A preview story is in today's edition).
George was born a slave on the Moses and Susan Carver farm about 1864. When George was an infant, outlaws kidnapped him and his mother, Mary. George was later found in Arkansas and was returned to the Carvers, but his mother was never found.
Carver became famous later in life when he studied plants, flowers and invented several uses for the common peanut. He later taught at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, and in 1921, he gave a captivating testimony before a United States Congress House Committee debating a peanut tariff bill. On Jan. 5, 1943, Carver died at Tuskegee, where he is buried. In July 1943, Congress designated George Washington Carver National Monument, which was the first park to honor an African-American scientist, educator and humanitarian.
Ever since I was a kid, my parents would take Greg and I over to the monument to not only learn about Carver, but also to walk the trail, look inside the farm house, observe nature and even have a picnic. To this day, I enjoy going to the monument and I still learn something new every time I attend.
If you have a few hours on Saturday, head to the monument with your family. They will all enjoy this event and the memories as well.
George Washington Carver National Monument preserves the birthplace and childhood home of George Washington Carver: scientist, educator, and humanitarian. The monument is located two miles west of Diamond, on Hwy. V, then south 1/2 mile on Carver Road. For more information, call the park at 325-4151.



Todd G. Higdon is the managing editor and writes a weekly column. He can be reached at thigdon@ neoshodailynews.com.