A sliver of a moon greeted me as I headed out for my daily walk along Wildcat Boulevard. It was a cold morning, 35 degrees, and the sky was clear and star-filled. There is something about a morning sky that is refreshing.

A sliver of a moon greeted me as I headed out for my daily walk along Wildcat Boulevard. It was a cold morning, 35 degrees, and the sky was clear and star-filled. There is something about a morning sky that is refreshing.
Sometimes I hear music as I walk along. Usually it is from a car on Neosho Boulevard which passes by. Lately, there has been a young man who runs/walks for exercise and sings as he jogs by. I enjoy people who do things that make them want to sing.
I was thinking about gardening in my youth the other day as I walked along. This was the time of the year when my mother and I drove the township roads looking for wild asparagus. You could tell where it was growing by the mature stalks.
The mature stalks look like tumble weeds. When we spotted one, Ma stopped the old 1939 Ford, and we got out to pick the fresh asparagus sprouts which were surrounding the mature stalk. Asparagus was one of the first fresh vegetables we ate each spring.
Another early plant was rhubarb. We had several sets of it out by the garden, next to the hog pen. Ours was the red rhubarb which is supposed be sweeter, but with smaller stems. Grandma Hillquist had a large patch of green rhubarb. She usually shared some with my mother.
Rhubarb is sour and requires a great deal of sugar to make it edible. My mother mostly made sauce, which is cooked and sweetened rhubarb. We ate it as a dessert.
After Kay and I moved to Missouri we had several rhubarb plants in the garden. We mixed it with sugar and strawberry Jello and made a fruit jam out of it. My brother still makes this and gave us a couple jars for Christmas a year or two ago. It was wonderful.
I have been having some tooth repairs in the last few weeks. As I walked along the other morning, I was comparing today’s treatment at Downtown Dental with my hometown dentist from 60 years ago.
Our local dentist did not have a receptionist or an assistant. He simply came out and called you in from the waiting room. He did not deaden anything and used the grinding drill that jarred your head. His work is still a part of some of my teeth.
At that time, the county nurse required every school kid to go to the dentist once a year. We were given a pink card the dentist was to sign when we had completed our yearly check up. Of course, the best times were when we were able to say, “Look Ma! No cavities!”
I recently read that Dobson Museum, Miami, Oklahoma, has a fossilized molar tooth that weighs six pounds. It is a mammoth tooth and was found near Afton by two men who were cleaning out a sulphur spring. Scientists estimate that the mammoth the tooth came from an animal which lived 200,000 years ago.
Take a walk, enjoy singers, early vegetables, and dental visits, use those signal lights, watch for all pedestrians, and see what you notice while passing along Wildcat Boulevard.    
 
Russell Hively writes a weekly column for the Daily News.