As I walked along Wildcat Boulevard one morning, I was thinking about an article I read about the attempt by Florida wildlife officials to eliminate the pylon snakes that are now populating the Everglades.

As I walked along Wildcat Boulevard one morning, I was thinking about an article I read about the attempt by Florida wildlife officials to eliminate the pylon snakes that are now populating the Everglades.
The report said that after the 15 months, ending in May, 2018, 1,000 pythons had been eliminated by the python hunters who are paid by the state. The best hunter had captured 110 pythons himself.
These hunters are not doing this for a living as they are only paid $8.10 per hour, although they do get a bonus for snakes which are so large and so long. These snake hunters are part-timers who like to get out in the swamps and try to curb the number of invasive pythons which now plague the Everglades.
Each year, places like George Washington Carver National Monument set aside a day when they ask volunteers to help remove invasive species from the monument lands.
Many invasive species are unexpected. At one time, people decided that the United States should have every species of animal and bird that Shakespeare had in his writings. They imported species like the starling and several other things which became invasive species. There is now an estimated 200 million starlings in the United States, and they can be a nuisance.
I have always been interested in recycling. I asked my son the other day if we were anywhere near recycling all the aluminum we use in the United States. The question had been on my mind with all this sanction/non-sanction news I had been hearing lately.
My son is interested in such things, and he had read that we recycle about 80% of the our aluminum. I followed up with a question about iron and steel. He said that the percentage is even better with over 100% recycled. The United States currently exports scrap iron and steel to 80 countries.  
I later did some research and found that an estimated $1 billion of aluminum cans are wasted(not recycled) in the United States each year. The industry spends $800 million to buy cans each year. About 67% of all cans are recycled with the rest of the aluminum making up the other 23% recycled each year.
An interesting fact is that 75% of all aluminum ever used in manufacturing in the United States is still in use. It may have been recycled and reformed many times, but it is still in use.
I recently read that that Missouri Department of Transportation is big on recycling concrete, metals, and old tires. The old tires are used for shingles and for tarred roads. The metals are sold: $282,000 last year.
Take a walk, use those signal lights, recycle all you can, watch for pedestrians, don’t add any invasive species, and see what you notice while passing along Wildcat Boulevard.
     
Russell Hively writes a weekly column for the Daily News.