In March I wrote about a good news story that my friend Jean Bird had sent me. Jean lives in an area of California that, at the time, was suffering from wildfires. She found and sent a newspaper article that told of a group of veterinarians who were treating some of the wildlife that had been burned in the fires.

In March I wrote about a good news story that my friend Jean Bird had sent me. Jean lives in an area of California that, at the time, was suffering from wildfires. She found and sent a newspaper article that told of a group of veterinarians who were treating some of the wildlife that had been burned in the fires.

They had wrapped the burned paws of some bears and one mountain lion in fish (tilapia) skins and then sewed them in place. The burns were then wrapped in rice paper and corn husks. The early treatment was showing remarkable progress and some of the animals were soon able to return to the wild.

This treatment apparently started in Brazil and had produced great results down there.

Last week the story of another bear cub that was burned in the current wildfires was being told by many newspapers and broadcast on several television networks. The cub was receiving this same fish skin treatment and was doing well.

Some of the stories referred to the same events that Jean Bird wrote about in late February.

I have no doubt that this treatment, or a similar treatment, will be used with humans and what a blessing that will be if it works. Burn victims suffer so very much.

This new injured cub was found by an employee of the local power company, PG&E. The cub was lying in a bed of ashes and the man reported the location to wildlife officials who came and took it for treatment.

Thinking back to the story of Smokey the Bear, I can imagine that power company man can relate to Theodore Roosevelt, the man who saved an injured bear that became the symbol of the U.S. Forest Service.

Also, because of Roosevelt's action, stuffed bears became known as Teddy Bears.

The PG&E guy who rescued the injured cub recently isn't likely to become President of the United States however, but I am grateful to him for his efforts.

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There is a movie that I have seen a couple of time and it is very unsettling. It is about some prisoners of war who had been captured by the Japanese during World War II. The story is based on men who actually went through that ordeal. The conditions for these and all the other prisoners were unspeakable. From what I have read, prisoners who were held by America in the war were treated much better.When I did research on prisoners at Camp Crowder, I found they were very surprised and pleased with their treatment.

As he watched that movie, titled "Unbroken," I heard a military veteran say, "Sure makes you want to buy a Japanese car."

Bad feelings and memories last for decades, so we should be careful how we treat others. That goes for individuals and nations.

 

Kay Hively writes a column for the Neosho Daily News.