Neosho High wrestling will host the 16th annual Coach Phillips Technique/Drill/Live Wrestling Camp on Monday, July 10 through Thursday, July 13 at the Neosho wrestling facility.

Neosho High wrestling will host the 16th annual Coach Phillips Technique/Drill/Live Wrestling Camp on Monday, July 10 through Thursday, July 13 at the Neosho wrestling facility.
Clinicians include Westminster College and Eierman Elite head coach Michael Eierman, Mizzou All-American wrestler Jaydin Eierman, and former Neosho High and Maryville University standout Nate Rodriguez.
The four-day camp starts each day with a novice session from 9 to 10:30 a.m, followed by an intermediate session from 9 to 11 a.m. and an advanced session from 12:30-4:30 p.m., plus an optional opportunity for wrestling from 11 a.m. through noon.
At the camp last year, former Neosho High wrestlers Blake Stauffer and Kyle Hostetter assisted.
“It’s great,” Stauffer said. “Any time I get a chance to come home, I take advantage of that and I always enjoy it. To come back and get to help with the wrestling camp, it’s great and I always enjoy doing that, as well.”
“It’s awesome,” Hostetter said. “It’s a nice feeling to have Coach Phillips ask you to come back and help these guys. Most of the guys in there are my teammates or the kids I’ve worked with before, but I really like the Jackson (Jackson High in Jackson, Missouri) group that came in. Any time you have a D1 All-American (Stauffer) in the room, it’s going to be cool. I’ve spent a lot of working him. He’s already had the success that I want in college. He’s a good resource to have and it’s nice for these kids to be able to pick his brain. It just helps the program grow.”
Stauffer, of course, remembered when he himself was a camp participant.
“I can remember every summer,” he said. “We had wrestling camps and I remember how much I looked up to those camp clinicians who came in, the college wrestlers that would show stuff. I thought those guys were everything. I thought they were the coolest guys in the world. So, when I come back, I try and interact with the kids, because I know how much that means to them. I’m assuming they’re looking at me the same way I was looking at the counselors I had. I’ve done a couple other camps this summer, but this camp being in my hometown, it’s great to come back and keep investing in this program.”
Stauffer was a graduate assistant for the Arizona State Sun Devils — his alma mater — last season.
Rodriguez — this year’s featured alumna — earned a NCAA Division II national title at 141 pounds during his senior year and in a feature before the season, Rodriguez discussed what Neosho and Neosho wrestling mean to him.
“To me, it’s just about giving back to what I was given,” Rodriguez said. “There would be a bunch of wrestlers that went off to college and when they came back for Thanksgiving or Christmas or what not, they were in the room helping us out. Even when they were done with their career, like Dane Espinoza and Trey Jackson, they helped out and put in a lot of effort to make us good.
“For me, when I compete in this sport, it’s how much can I learn and how much can I develop, so that way I can always give back to Neosho. If people keep having that mentality, then it’s a neverending cycle. What I can give back, then those people can go off to college and they can give back. I just want to continue that process.”