As the Fourth of July is fast approaching, the sights and sounds of fireworks are in the air — and the Neosho Fire Department staff is reminding the public to use safety precautions when celebrating.


As the Fourth of July is fast approaching, the sights and sounds of fireworks are in the air — and the Neosho Fire Department staff is reminding the public to use safety precautions when celebrating.

“We are trying to encourage everyone make sure that they will have a safe and happy Fourth of July,” Neosho Fire Chief Greg Hickman said.

According to the city ordinances and city codes, “the sale of fireworks inside the city is from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. June 20 through July 10. Only can discharge fireworks inside the city limits from June 20 through July 10 from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. No torpedoes, torpedo canes or bottle rockets can be sold or used within the city.”

Fireworks tents can be found both inside and outside the city limits. The tents have to be licensed and inspected.

And when shooting off fireworks, Hickman offers some advice.

“Make sure that children are being supervised when they are discharging fireworks, because event sparklers can reach or exceed 1,200 degrees,” he said. “The fire of those, the wires are hot, you can get third degree burns from those. Aerial displays, things like that, whenever you light them, make sure that you get back a safe distance, because you don’t know where exactly they are going to go. Sometimes they are supposed to go one way and they end up going another.”
Some of the injuries associated with fireworks include eye injuries and burns, caused by things exploding too close to the face.

“If you are doing yard displays and something does not go off, if it is a dud, leave it alone,” Hickman said. “There is no sense on trying to play with it to get it to reignite, never try to relight one. Usually, we advise to have a bucket of water. If you have a bad one that does not light, or it does not go off, just throw it into the bucket. Because there is no sense of messing with it, because you can get hurt. Let it sit, don’t walk up upon it right away.”

Hickman also suggested to be considerate when lighting fireworks, coordinate within a group if shooting off fireworks, make sure that everybody is safe and don’t throw or point fireworks at anyone.

In 2007 nationwide, there were 11 people that were killed with fireworks. There were an estimated more than 30,000 fires caused by fireworks, 9,000 injuries from fireworks and about $34 million damage done by fireworks in 2006.

“Locally, we have been rather fortunate we have not had any major problems or serious injuries that I am aware of,” the fire chief said. “We have had a few small fires, basically children playing with fireworks in the wrong location, setting grass fires or leaves on fire.”