On Sunday during the Conservation Federation of Missouri’s summer board meeting at the Civic in Neosho, the city was recognized by the Missouri Department of Conservation with a partnership award.


On Sunday during the Conservation Federation of Missouri’s summer board meeting at the Civic in Neosho, the city was recognized by the Missouri Department of Conservation with a partnership award.

“The Missouri Department of Conservation and the Southwest Community Conservation Team are presenting a partnership recognition award to the city of Neosho for participating in a two-year community conservation program here in town,” Department of Conservation Community Planner Ronda Headland said. “The Community Conservation Initiative began two years ago and at that time, three teams were formed in the state and here in Southwest Missouri, the first city designated as a focus area for our team was the city of Neosho. The program is evolving, so we are not for sure that we will spend another two-year time period with any future cities, but that is what we felt like we needed to spend with Neosho to see through all of the plans and projects that we started in 2010.”

Neosho has been a focus city for the department’s community conservation efforts in the southwest part of the state.

The partnership between the Department of Conservation and the city has resulted in the creation of a habitat improvement project at Morse Park, an Ozark Cavefish recharge delineation survey, a forestry stewardship plan for the city, a community workshop, an urban deer survey, a Hickory Creek “trout opener” event to raise awareness about urban fishing opportunities and an urban stream publication.

The award was a framed print of a bird and accepting the award was Neosho Mayor Pro-tem Steve Hart.

 “As a citizen of Neosho, and a city council member, I am so happy for all of these people,” Hart said, pointing to Neosho City Manager Troy Royer and parks and recreation director John Jordon. “I just get to stand up here and accept the nice award.”

Headland added her praise for the project.

“We are extremely pleased with the process, with the participation with city government, with the interest of the community,” she said. “We will now evaluate the program, the process and everything we did here in Neosho, and try to come up with some lessons learned that we can use to improve our program in the future. But on the whole, there is nothing negative to be said about our experience with the city of Neosho, it was all very positive.”

Royer said the award would be at a place where all can see it.

“It is going to get hung right in city hall and be displayed for everybody to come and see,” Royer said.