Fiber enthusiasts, both novice and advanced, had the opportunity to polish their skills Friday and Saturday at the second annual Fiber Daze event, held at Crowder College.

Fiber enthusiasts, both novice and advanced, had the opportunity to polish their skills Friday and Saturday at the second annual Fiber Daze event, held at Crowder College.

The program offered numerous classes and workshops on the fiber arts, as well as a market of vendors with a wide selection of yarns, tools and fibers. 

Fiber Daze, sponsored in part by the Missouri Sheep Merchandising Council, the University of Missouri Extension, Lincoln University, Crowder College, and the Southwest Missouri Fiber Folks Guild, attracted approximately 60 people from across the four-state area.

“There is nothing like it in this part of the state,” said Joi Chupp, vice president of the Fiber Folks of Southwest Missouri, and a main organizer of the event. “There’s no place people can go really to learn the skills, the knitting, crocheting, spinning, weaving or any of that.”

Participation in the event required a $10 registration fee, as well as whatever fees were associated with the classes that attendees chose to take. 

Mary McCreery, president of the Fiber Folks of Southwest Missouri, said Fiber Daze  drew a larger crowd this year than at last year’s inaugural event.

“I think it’s grown a little bit this year, I think as word gets out more it’s going to continue to grow,” McCreery said.

McCreery said the group hopes to continue Fiber Daze as an annual event.

“We want to increase the knowledge of authentic fiber crafts and talents,” McCreery said.

She said the group makes no profit from hosting the program, with all proceeds going to fund the two-day affair.

Jonee Davis, the group’s treasurer, said the program offers courses for beginners and those with advanced skills.

“We offer something for everyone, of any skill level, that has to do with the fiber arts,” Davis said.

Courses included beginner’s knitting, crocheting and spinning, as well as more advanced classes.

“We also offer classes that would improve your techniques you already had,” Davis said.

Chupp said the selection of vendors is also a big draw for the event.

“All the yarn shops have shutdown so the vendors are awesome,” Chupp said. “Even people that don’t want to come to the classes can come and purchase yarns.”

The event also offered courses such as basket weaving, natural dyes, color blending, silk spinning and web designing, and classes lasted anywhere from one to four hours.