Our annual meeting of the McDonald County Historical Society was held Saturday and we had a great time of learning from Laurie Bennett all about Rocky Comfort, how it got its name and a sharing of the lifestyle in the early years.

Our annual meeting of the McDonald County Historical Society was held Saturday and we had a great time of learning  from Laurie Bennett all about Rocky Comfort, how it got its name and a sharing of the lifestyle in the early years.

Like Laurie, I choose to remember the cup half full and not half empty. Living in McDonald County in the 1930s and 1940s left me with memories I treasure. Early memories of box suppers at Lone Dove and long winter rides to and from school in the back of a covered pickup truck. Friends and relatives of mine who share my memories recollect cold and poverty and discomfort. I choose instead to remember the one room schoolhouse warmed by a big wood stove and games of dare base at recess. I remember Christmas plays at New Bethel under the tutelage of Miss Croddy and spring walks home along the lane of wild violets. Others may remember a world without indoor plumbing or electricity and I remember the peace and tranquility without television, without garbage disposals, dishwashers, walkmen or telephones. I choose to remember the warmth of a family, the security I felt and a world oblivious to the atomic bomb. Selective memory? Perhaps.

I congratulate Laurie in what she chooses to remember. Laurie shared that Rocky Comfort was once a very prosperous community. She talked about the railroad that wanted to go through R.C., was discouraged and, instead went to Wheaton, she talked about the destruction created by a tornado in 1880 and talked about the many businesses once operating there. She shared the fact of many fires, causes unknown, the churches, and the Horner Institute (the building is now a private home) one of the first colleges in the area that later moved to Fairview. Discussed was the boundaries of Barry, Newton and McDonald counties and the Barry County and Chitwood cemeteries.

It was a very enjoyable afternoon and we would like to invite all to join us as we meet every other month, the third Sunday of the month at 2 p.m. at the new McDonald County courthouse in Pineville. President Raylene Lamb shared the progress being made on the grand old courthouse in the center of the square, soon to be the new McDonald County Historical Museum. If you would like to visit the current museum do come by at 302 Harmon, just off the square in Pineville, open Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Check out all the latest news at www.mcdonaldcohistory.org.     

Alberta Anders writes a weekly column for the Daily News.