When decisions are made by those who don’t represent us, then we’re left with the fallout of actions this week by the EPA and a lone judge in North Dakota. Such was the case when a federal judge blocked EPA’s Clean Water rule from taking effect Friday that would have impacted Missouri and 12 other states.

Like them or not, elected officials represent every U.S. citizen and are put in office to make decisions in our best interests.
When decisions are made by those who don’t represent us, then we’re left with the fallout of actions this week by the EPA and a lone judge in North Dakota. Such was the case when a federal judge blocked EPA’s Clean Water rule from taking effect Friday that would have impacted Missouri and 12 other states.
Probably as many people across the country are as glad as others are mad that Judge Ralph Erikson of the U.S. District Court in North Dakota, at least for now, stopped the EPA basically from expanding the definition of water, as well as the agency’s authority over it. Those who are glad include Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster and several agricultural groups, such as the Missouri Farm Bureau,  Missouri Corn Growers Association and Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.
We’re not going to get into the merits of whether the rule is a good one or not that pits farmers and others against environmental concerns. That’s an argument for another day.
Instead, the entire process is wrong as the decision to make the rule comes from appointed bureaucrats, while the decision to block the rule comes from a judge appointed for life. Determining whether an agency rule is best of the country should be decided by those living in the country via their elected officials. An agency shouldn’t be able to make any rule it wants without checks and balance, just as one judge shouldn’t be able to block a rule for the same reason.
Yes, voters elect the president, who makes appointments. In some cases, Congress must confirm the appointments, but not all of the time and certainly not in the case of many in federal agencies.
What’s needed is a process for agency rules to be vetted by elected officials. Of course, decisions could favor one political party over another based on which one is in the majority, but that’s the way it works in the U.S. governmental process. If we don’t like it, we can vote someone in or out of office. The same can’t be said for federal agencies and judges.