The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 163 in Neosho is dedicated to helping veterans, active military and families. In doing that, the auxiliary also can save other lives like horses and dogs.

The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 163 in Neosho is dedicated to helping veterans, active military and families. In doing that, the auxiliary also can save other lives like horses and dogs.
On Nov. 1, Dawn Newlan of nearby Trinity Circle ranch visited Unit 163 in Neosho and spoke about her being called to rescue wild mustangs and how those mustangs help veterans. Horses Healing Hearts’ mission is to help any man, woman or child who suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or emotional trauma, with the main focus on veterans and their families.
The unconditional love these horses give freely at the ranch gives them peace of mind and body. The veterans learn to work with the horses and find strength and balance of mind, body and soul. That helps control their life instead of it controlling them.
Horses Healing Hearts is a 501(c) not-for-profit and depends on donations to maintain the ministry. Wild mustangs not used for the ministry are available for adoption.
Newlan is a member of Unit 163. Donations can be mailed to Trinity Circle, 7370 Marten Road, Neosho, MO 64850. Paypal donations can be sent to hhh@horseshealinghearts.us. For more information, call (417) 455-1200, or visit the Trinity Circle Horses Healing Hearts Facebook page or www.horseshealinghearts.us.
On Nov. 29, Unit 163 welcomed speakers Roy Iveson and Dale Gardner of Grove, Okla. They started One Veteran, One Dog, Two Lives Saved.
Iveson is a Korean War veteran Navy corpsman. He was given a black lab named Sally to help him with his PTSD. She became certified as a service dog and earned Canine Good Citizenship certification from American Kennel Club.
Gardner was deployed three times to Iraq as an Army medic. He was given his service dog, Willow, trained by Sally. Willow has been instrumental in helping Gardner with his PTSD.
He works daily with Iveson to train other service dogs. Most of their dogs have been adopted from humane shelters, with one rescued from being euthanized by 17 minutes.
Many of these dogs have been abused, but with training become life savers to veterans. Since March 1, Sally has helped train other service dogs, resulting in successful placement of 36 teams (dog with a veteran) locally and 84 teams nationwide.
One Veteran, One Dog, Two Lives Saved is a 501(c) not-for-profit and is in need of donations. For more information or to make a donation, contact Iveson at (913) 284-3457 or Gardner at (918) 964-0712.