Although first introduced by Benjamin Franklin over two centuries ago, Jane Fonda popularized the saying, "No pain, no gain," in 1982.

Although first introduced by Benjamin Franklin over two centuries ago, Jane Fonda popularized the saying, "No pain, no gain," in 1982.
She used it as a catchphrase to promote her aerobics videos, emphasizing the reward of pushing one’s body past the anguish of aching muscles to achieve maximum results.
Others, such as Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwarzenegger, later advocated their own style of "no pain, no gain."
Many people since then have asked, "Must you experience pain when in the process of trying to improve yourself?"
In 2006 few imagined the severity of pain that could result from simply watching a major league baseball game. Yet, Texas Rangers’ Alfonso Soriano "smoked" a foul ball that struck a woman hard in the abdomen as she was sitting in the stands.
The jolting effect of its sudden impact not only hurt, but it knocked the wind out of her. Slowly she recovered while at the park. But, later, just to be on the safe side, she sought out a doctor to see if anything had ruptured.
While at the hospital, the physician had her undergo a CAT scan. The image-producing test showed evidence of ovarian cancer just below the point of where the ball hit her.
It was as if the ball had been divinely directed to a specific area of her body, so that the tumors the doctor found might be discovered. She called it a miracle.
Had it not been for the discomfort and pain she experienced while at the ballpark, and the capacity of modern medical equipment to detect anomalies inside the human body, the disease would have eventually killed her.
Better than a CAT scan, the Bible says that God Himself watched every stage of our development inside our mother’s womb, and even now sees the things within us that need immediate attention.
That which has proven fatal for everyone since Adam and Eve is found in each of us—sin. It is mankind’s foremost killer. A disease that afflicts everyone with whom we come in contact.
It works as plaque building up in a person’s arteries: one day, over time, if the condition is not treated, it will result in the eternal death of one’s soul.
The cure for this disease is the blood Jesus shed on the cross. There, His suffering caused our sins to go into "remission." It made forgiveness possible.
To an even greater effect than any of Jane Fonda’s workout videos might have on the human body, the pain Jesus endured 2,000 years ago makes our spirits "fit" for the Kingdom of God.

Mark Edmondson writes a column for the Neosho Daily News.