Even though they once numbered in the hundreds (perhaps thousands), one-room school houses in Missouri have disappeared through the years. But like what is being done now with the "Caver School" in Neosho, efforts are being made to preserve some of these educational relics from our past.

Even though they once numbered in the hundreds (perhaps thousands), one-room school houses in Missouri have disappeared through the years. But like what is being done now with the "Caver School" in Neosho, efforts are being made to preserve some of these educational relics from our past.
The Missouri Historic Schools Alliance, headquartered in Springfield, is leading the way. A part of the Greene County Extension Council, the Alliance is headed by David Burton, a communication specialist for the Southwest Region of Extension. The program started in 2009 and has made great progress since.
Since the program began, there have been eight school restorations, 12 books written on historic schools, six schools nominated to be on the national register and 14 articles giving state and national exposure to the program.
While these figures are official, there may be many other projects being carried out by groups not affiliated with the Alliance in Springfield. The colored school in Neosho is an example.
Currently a state directory is being put together and the Neosho school will be included. When Burton was notified about the current work in Neosho, he was very surprised, saying "…(I) honestly knew nothing about this project!"
In the general area, several schools have been saved over the years. Although they are not perfectly restored, they reflect their former glory. The old Cedar Creek School which was located at Tipton Ford, was moved to the historical park in Neosho and is mainly used for meetings and programs. A country school was moved into Seneca and was restored by the Seneca Historical Society.
Even those schools that are not restored to their original condition serve as a reminder of the past, and many say the one-room schools provided an exceptional education to the students who studied there. Many successful people in our nation's history (even presidents) are products of one-room schools.
The restoration of the Carver school in Neosho will take a few years to complete, but Neosho can be very proud that we are finally started on this effort. Hopefully that pride will turn into donations, large and small, to guarantee the success of the project.