Many times when excavations of historic places take place, an expert is brought in to help identify and classify items found on site.

Many times when excavations of historic places take place, an expert is brought in to help identify and classify items found on site.
This is true with the work being done on the 1872 Neosho Colored School here in Neosho.
This past Friday, the expert brought in was Connie (Slaughter) Langum, a young lady born and raised in Neosho. Langum is trained as a para-professional archeological monitor. She also has 25 years in the National Park Service, with 22 years as ranger and historian at Wilson's Creek National Battlefield.
As the excavations have progressed on the little school, all items other than building materials which were found on site were placed in plastic five-gallon pails. When Langum arrived, she sorted through these items looking for anything which would be considered "period,"—items which could have been there when George Carver attended the school.
She selected seven or eight items from the plastic pails, mostly bottles. She will take these and do her own intensive research or refer them to others with more expertise than she has.
Discovering that the little building on Young Street was actually the school the George Carver attended has been a pleasant surprise for the citizens of Neosho and all people interested in history, she said.
The small 16X24 foot building is owned by the Carver Birthplace Association. They are in the first year of a four-year plan to restore the building. The staff at the George Washington Carver National Monument provides technological support, but does not actually do work there.
Another reason Langum chose this day to come to Neosho was because it was the day the cement pad under the front porch was being jack-hammered. Many times unusual items are tossed under cement pads before they are poured. The group was in hopes there would be historic items that Langum could examine.
Langum said it was pleasure coming home to use her expertise, and it was nice that she could use her knowledge in her hometown. She said someone asked her where there was a good place to eat in Neosho.
 "I told her I was not sure, because I always eat at my sister's," she said.
Welcome home Connie.