The 1872 Neosho Colored School is back on its original footprint after being set aside to remake the base for this historic schoolhouse.

The 1872 Neosho Colored School is back on its original footprint after being set aside to remake the base for this historic schoolhouse.
As funds allowed, the Carver Birthplace Association (CBA) has been restoring the school to its original condition. Much of the work has been done by volunteers and some by professional restoration businesses.
Since the CBA has taken charge of the school, many mysteries have been solved about the school and its most famous student, George Washington Carver. One mystery was recently solved when the school was moved to make the new foundation. There has been questions about the stone base of the original school. Some felt the original foundation was made of field stone and some argued that limestone would have been the stone of choice.
When the school was moved a few months ago by Tipton and Sons, of Carthage, workers found a large pile of limestone underneath the school. This find solved the latest mystery.
The large pieces of limestone were removed from the old basement and these old stones from the 1800s will be used to face the concrete that was used for the new foundation.
The next project at the school will be the construction of a new chimney, and then a new roof will be put in place. These projects will empty the coffers, so until more funds are raised, the schoolhouse project will be halted.
But until then, historic little schoolhouse will be buttoned up tight with a firm foundation and a new roof.