A blinking 25-miles-per-hour sign now flashes on Wildcat Boulevard as I walk by it each morning. The new sign is on the big hill on Valley Street. It is solar powered and flashes on and off to remind people not to drive so fast down the hill.

A blinking 25-miles-per-hour sign now flashes on Wildcat Boulevard as I walk by it each morning. The new sign is on the big hill on Valley Street. It is solar powered and flashes on and off to remind people not to drive so fast down the hill.
I like solar powered signs like this. It makes sense to use solar power and not have to use electricity on every flashing sign.
We have friends who have installed solar electricity at their home. It is backed up with an elaborate battery system, and they are quite pleased with the results.
I recently read an interesting newspaper article about which candies were favorite Halloween candies in different states. It seems that the candy wholesaler CandyShop compiled this list and the following are some of the results.
For example, Missouri and Colorado are two states which favor Milky Way bars for their Halloween treats. Colorado preferred Twix bars.
Snickers head the list in Oklahoma.(They consumer 20,000 pounds of the famous bars.) Arkansas trick or treaters really like Jolly Ranchers, followed by Butterfinger bars. Kansas kids prefer Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, changing from M&M’s a year ago.
Texas loves Starbursts. They consume two million pounds of Starbursts each Halloween time. They also really like Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups. New Mexico likes old-fashioned candy corn.(I thought Iowans would like candy corn best.) Jolly Rancher is second and saltwater taffy is still popular in New Mexico.
New York prefers SourPatch Kids, and Florida likes Skittles best. California loves M&M’s, while Washington state kids really like Tootsie Pops. (My personal favorite.)
What I found interesting about this study was that the most popular candies are tried, tested, and have been around for many years. Also do you notice that most of these candies have sweet chocolate as a part of them?
We were gone most of Halloween evening, so we had no trick or treaters. We did have some candies ready in case anyone dropped in. We had Butterfingers, Milky Ways, and 3 Musketeers bars ready by the front door.
A few years ago, our niece wanted to pass out candy to trick or treaters. She has lived in the country all her life and has never had the little visitors like people do in town. She enjoyed very much the kids and their costumes.
It is sad that a few mean and deranged people have made people leery of going out in the neighborhood trick or treating. Will this custom die in time? I hope not. How can people not like a little kid in an elephant costume or a princess?
Take a walk, enjoy your favorite candy once in a while, use those signal lights, always watch for pedestrians, and see what you notice while passing along on Wildcat Boulevard.  
 
 
 Russell Hively writes a weekly column for the Daily News.