The other morning as I walked along Wildcat BoulevardI I noticed how dandelions seem to pop up after a person has mowed. You can mow one evening and by the next day, dandelions are “standing tall.”

The other morning as I walked along Wildcat BoulevardI I noticed how dandelions seem to pop up after a person has mowed. You can mow one evening and by the next day, dandelions are “standing tall.”
My fear is that getting rid of dandelions will harm the many wildflowers in my yard, so I let them grow. In an empty lot I walk by each morning, the dandelions have been totally left alone and some of them are nearly two feet tall.
I found a white clover bracelet the other morning as I walked along. For some reason little kids, especially girls, like to weave bracelets out of white clover blossoms. I have seen them made out of dandelion blossoms, too, but white clover smells better.
Most little girls like jewelry and enjoy weaving things, so I guess making natural flower bracelets are fun.
I was thinking about an article I read in my Minnesota hometown newspaper the night before my walk. It was called “Historic 'Ice-Out' Comes Ashore.” It told about the ice breakup that came to Lake Yankton on the north edge of my hometown.
In the spring when temperatures have been warm for a time, the ice on frozen lakes begins to “honeycomb.” It looks like bubbles of air melt upward into the ice, resemble a bee’s honeycomb.
If a stiff wind comes up when the ice is honeycombed, it will blow across a lake and pile up ice on the shore. This year Lake Yankton had tons of honeycombed ice piled up in drifts along the shore. The piles were eight to ten feet tall. A photograph in the newspaper showed a man standing beside one of the piles of honeycombed ice.
The honeycombed ice, which was blown on shore, damaged some docks and boat lifts that were not even in the water.
The newspaper article went on to explain that the rapid ice-out was the fastest since April, 1962, an amazing fifty-six years ago. The lake went from frozen over to open in only 24 hours.
Although honeycombed ice occurs every year, it takes a strong wind to push it across the lake or slough onto the shore. If there is no wind it simply melts in the warmer weather and sun.
When I was about ten or eleven years old, we had honeycombed ice that piled up on the shore of the big open slough on our farm. It was a nice day, warm and sunny. The grasses had just begun to grow and my dog Muffy and I were down by the slough. Suddenly, I began to hear twinkling sounds, almost like small bells ringing.
I looked around and saw that the honeycombed ice was being forced up on shore by a stiff south wind. I recall my dog, laid on a hillside near the sough, and watched the ice pile up. For quite a while, the ice tumbled up on shore and continued its twinkling sounds.
The piles of ice were not like those that happened this year on Lake Yankton. The piles that Muffy and I watched were only a couple feet tall and melted in a couple days.
Take a walk, remember some of the marvels of nature like honeycombed ice, use those signal lights, watch for pedestrians, and see what you notice while passing along Wildcat Boulevard.  

Russell Hively writes a weekly column for the Daily News.